Thursday, 14 March 2013 13:55

CACI FORUM: Iran and the Caucasus

Thursday, March 14, 2013

CACI FORUM

"Central Asia-Caucasus Institute"

Iran and the Caucasus

Iran's expanding activities with respect to the three independent states of the Caucasus have scarcely been noticed, but warrant close attention. To what extent are these normal and simply a revival of the commercial and cultural relationships dating back centuries before the Russian Empire expanded into the region? To what extent are they, rather, the product of destabilizing ideological or geopolitical aspirations in Tehran today? And, if the latter, what are their broader implications to the region and to the world order and how should the U.S. respond?

Published in Forums & Events

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

CACI Forum

"Central-Asia Caucasus Institute"

The Impact of Events in the Arab World on Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Turkey, Part II

On April 18 CACI offered a program on “Impact of Events in the Arab World on Central Asia, the Caucasus and Turkey” featuring US diplomats and experts. On April 26 we return to the same subject, this time with analyses and views from seven rising leaders from Central Asia and the Caucasus, CACI’s current Rumsfeld Fellows.

Rebirth of domino theories following the upheavals that began in Tunisia and Egypt were first applied to other Arab countries. What are the arguments for and against such a hypothesis as it applies to the countries of Central Asia and the Caucasus?  The purpose of this session will be to gain fresh perspectives from young opinion leaders from the region on how their respective states and publics are responding to the Arab events including the likely course of developments in each one.

Published in Forums & Events

Monday, April 18, 2011

CACI Forum

"The Central-Asia Caucasus Institute"

The Impact of Events in the Arab World on Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Turkey

Among the many consequences of the upheavals that began in Tunisia and Egypt has been a dramatic rebirth of domino theories. First applied to other Arab countries, they are now being discussed with respect to countries further afield, including Central Asia, the Caucasus and Turkey. What are the arguments for and against such a hypothesis as it applies to the countries of these regions,, and how will it affect their foreign policies? What evidence has emerged in these countries in support of both the pro and con sides of the argument? What, if anything, is likely to occur, where, why, and how? How are regional states and publics responding to the Arab events and what  is the likely course of future developments there? These questions will be addressed by a panel of experts and by an audience that will include many persons with detailed knowledge of the regions in question.

Published in Forums & Events

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